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Publication
September 25, 2020

Prop. 22 would let app-based drivers like me keep our freedom and flexibility

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By Al Porche

Six months into the worst health and economic crises anyone alive has ever known, California’s economy is reeling. Millions have lost their jobs and many laid-off Californians have turned to app-based delivery to make ends meet. But these newfound opportunities could be gone for good unless the voters step up to save them.

Publication
September 17, 2020

Why I’m Supporting Proposition 22: The Self-Employed Deserve A Voice

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By Greg Ferenstein

This post makes the case that there are millions of gig workers who genuinely benefit from being independent contractors; the law should reflect their voice with public policies that improve conditions for self-employment, rather than restricting access to it.

Publication
September 8, 2020

White-Collar, White Professionals Get AB5 Exemptions. Why Don’t Black and Brown App-Based Drivers?

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By Alice Huffman

The California legislature is known for producing progressive, forward-thinking policies that empower people of color. But when it comes to protecting the freedom of workers who drive cars, buy groceries, and deliver other services via app-based platforms—the majority of them Black and Brown Californians—the legislature is failing our community.

Publication
September 4, 2020

Unions Seek to ‘Liberate’ Gig Workers From Flexibility

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By Michael Saltsman

Does the future of America’s labor movement run through our smartphones? As many as a quarter of American adults earn income as gig workers, either through an app-based service like Uber or Lyft, or as traditional freelancers. Labor advocates would grant gig workers the right to bargain collectively. But unionization might hurt these workers more than it helps.

Publication
August 31, 2020

Over 100 exemptions to AB 5 make the case for Prop 22

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By Jim Pyatt

AB 5 is a hot mess. Mere months after it took effect, the same politicians who forced AB 5 on California’s workforce are adding more exemptions to the law—bringing the total number of exemptions to over 100. They are all listed below. There’s a reason they have to keep adding fixes to the shoddily crafted legislation: the law is completely unworkable for an extraordinarily large number of professions and occupations. Already, the bill is creating a state of confusion for workers like me. But the scramble to add so many exemptions makes three things undeniably clear to app-based drivers and California voters alike.

Publication
August 21, 2020

It’s up to voters to save rideshare and delivery services from Assembly Bill 5

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By Steven Greenhut – Editorial Board member, Southern California News Group

Uber and Lyft, we hardly knew you. As the California attorney general pursues its lawsuit against these ride-sharing companies, to force them to comply immediately with the state’s virtual ban on using contractors as workers, the firms had announced last week that they would temporarily leave the state as they retool into smaller operations.

Publication
July 27, 2020

Prop. 22 Protects Independent Contractors

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By Dr. Tecoy Porter Sr.

Although millions of Californians are suffering, people of color and disadvantaged communities have been disproportionately ravaged by the double blow of the coronavirus pandemic and resulting economic meltdown.

Publication
July 26, 2020

California attorney general loads language on 2 November measures

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By John Diaz – Editorial Page Editor, San Francisco Chronicle

California’s attorney general is charged with providing a “true and impartial” title and summary for ballot propositions. Once again, the attorney general’s office is being legitimately accused of skewing the language in favor of one side of an issue.

Publication
June 12, 2020

California Voters Must Protect App-Based Drivers and Services

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By Patricia Mulholland

Five years ago, traditional jobs stopped being an option for me. As a retired, disabled Vietnam veteran and a caretaker for an ill family member, I needed to earn a living that kept the stress down but the flexibility up so I could meet my family obligations.

Publication
May 19, 2020

App-Based Gigs Keep Me Working During the Coronavirus Pandemic

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By Alfred Porche III

Two months ago my entire life changed. In March, I worried about stocking up on toilet paper and buying masks. Then the state’s 40 million residents were asked to stay in their homes with limited social contact because of COVID-19 and I signed up to help bring food and supplies to people who can’t get out.

Publication
December 31, 2019

Despite AB 5, Uber Drivers Would Rather Quit Than Be Employees

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By Tony Pierce

On Wednesday, Gov. Gavin Newsom signed into law Assembly Bill 5, which is intended to reduce worker misclassification by turning “independent contractors,” like rideshare drivers, into employees of the companies they work with. The new law would force giants like Lyft and Uber to do things like pay a minimum wage, provide health insurance benefits and paid sick days off.

Publication
December 31, 2019

California’s new gig economy law was meant to help workers. But it will likely hurt them instead

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By Louis Hyman – Contributor, CNN Business

On January 1, a law went into effect in California known as AB5 that is intended to reclassify many of the state’s independent contractors as regular employees and give them the workplace benefits they deserve, such as unemployment and disability insurance. Perhaps even more importantly, as employees, these gig workers will have access to the full body of rights under labor and employment law. Without those rights, contractors — Uber and Lyft drivers, freelancers and other gig workers — are being exploited. As employees under the new law, it is hoped, they will enjoy job stability and decent wages. The unstated assumption of lawmakers here is that companies will simply comply with the law and convert those gig jobs into full-time positions.

Publication
October 31, 2019

California Destroys $1 Trillion Gig Economy With New Law

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By Heidi Lynne Kurter – Contributor, Forbes

California isn’t shy when it comes to making the daily headlines. Often heralded as a progressive utopia, the Golden State recently signed into law, Assembly Bill 5 (AB5) that will change the landscape of the gig worker economy. Stemming from the groundbreaking court decision established in Dynamex West Inc. v. Superior Court of Los Angeles, the California Supreme Court found Dynamex’s workers were misclassified as independent contractors rather than employees.

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Paid for by Yes on 22 – Save App-Based Jobs & Services: a coalition of on-demand drivers and platforms, small businesses, public safety and community organizations. Committee major funding from Uber Technologies, Lyft, and DoorDash.

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